The State-Man’s Greatest Enemy

Big Brother Is Watching You!

Much of the major problems in front of mankind can be traced back to the state. The state drags innocent people into war. Immigration restrictions throw a large part of humanity into poverty. Government monopolization of courts and police makes justice a matter of pull, power and luck. Credit expansion leads to price rise and boom-bust cycles. Involuntary unemployment results as of the minimum wage law and sanction of labor union coercion. Price controls result in shortages. Rent controls forces the formation of slums. State funded education paralyzes the minds of innocent children. Protectionism leads to poverty and wars. High priced, poor quality products result under Government monopolization of industries. Taxation prevents capital accumulation. Tens of thousands of people die on public roads every year. The war on drugs ensures a life of crime and poverty for many. Social security, public education and government run agencies abet child abuse. The health care system is a vast bureaucracy which chokes many patients to death and makes treatment out of reach to most of the rest. Various government regulations strangulate the economy. Some estimates say that there were nearly 262 million deaths caused by the Government in the twentieth century. In the light of all these facts, there is no reason for a person who loves humanity to support the state.

Yet, we hear that the state is essential for the survival of mankind-that the state is the fountainhead of all progress. Without the state, it is argued, the poor will be underfed, unclad and unsheltered. Crime will be rampant and chaos will ensue.  Thomas Hobbes wrote that life without the state would be a “war of all against all”, and “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” Enemies of liberty have often quoted Hobbes, pointing at various misrepresentations of history, and conjuring up various hypothetical scenarios to substantiate their claims. Ironically, many professed lovers of liberty consider the state as a rights protector. But the state can recognize ones rights only to a particular extent-only to the extent that a rapist can recognize a woman’s right to love making.

Yet, we hear that the state is essential for the survival of mankind-that the state is the fountainhead of all progress. Without the state, it is argued, the poor will be underfed, unclad and unsheltered. Crime will be rampant and chaos will ensue.  Thomas Hobbes wrote that life without the state would be a “war of all against all”, and “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” Enemies of liberty have often quoted Hobbes, pointing at various misrepresentations of history, and conjuring up various hypothetical scenarios to substantiate their claims. Ironically, many professed lovers of liberty consider the state as a rights protector. But the state can recognize ones rights only to a particular extent-only to the extent that a rapist can recognize a woman’s right to love making.

Does theory and history support the claims of enemies of liberty? No. It tells an entirely different story. Government comprises of ordinary men and women with no superhuman powers whatsoever. While it is true that pure liberty had never existed anywhere, all the so called public goods were provided by private individuals at many points in human history, in a much efficient and profitable manner. There is a seven hundred year long history of privateering in naval defense. Most Light houses were once privately owned by packaging the charge with harbor fee, with the Government involved only in enforcing private property rights in them. Most roads were privately owned. Postal service was private in many parts of the world. Even today, there is private production of security services in the form of policemen, detectives and arbitrators. It is estimated that more than seventy five percent of the arbitration at present is private. Private charity exists. The market produces television and radio broadcast signals profitably, which are by the definition of some economists non-excludable and public. Black market private radio broadcasts are run much profitably, even in parts of the world where the state nationalized radio broadcasting. As Randall Holcombe points out, Bill Gates became one of the richest men in the world in a period of about a decade, selling a public good. Money was privately produced. There was the law merchant in the past, as Bruce Benson had pointed out. Much order existed in near anarchist societies in the past and crime rates were strikingly low. There is overwhelming historical evidence to prove that these societies worked wonderfully and had sophisticated legal codes. Crime rates were strikingly low, and this includes the American Wild West which is usually portrayed as a chaotic, violent society. In Celtic Ireland, it lasted for nearly thousand one hundred years, and in medieval Iceland, 290 years. Those were civilized societies with no Government administered justice. Even when these societies collapsed, it was not due to extreme anarchy, but due to contradictions in the anarchistic structure.

Coercive Labour Policy Creates Unemployment

Education Is Not A Birthright

Privatize Health Care

Inflation Is Implicit Theft

Economic Depressions And Capitalism

Taxation Is Robbery

Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free

The evils of protectionism

War And Capitalism

Public Roads

Monopoly Courts And Police

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